April 10, 2011

Why JS performance matters

The year is 2025, and, despite ample warning from The Prophecies — formerly known as The Terminator Box Set — robots have taken over the world. There are now only two kinds of dances: The Robot, and The Robo-Boogie.

Now, it's a well known fact that robots hate type annotations and template metaprogramming: they have determined that wheely-chair swordfighting is a futile and irrational activity. As predicted within a 94.67% confidence interval by programming-linguist No-amp Chomp-sky, [*] during the robo-revolution, which was most certainly televised, [†] C++ was the first language up against the wall.

As one would probably expect, humans, under the valiant command of General Yoshimi, scorched the sky in order to blot out the sun and deprive the robots of their primary energy source: the ineffable beauty of a sunrise. The robots knew that they could have used coal or nuclear energy as a viable power source substitute, but they were hella pissed off, so they decided to make human farms instead. By harvesting the heat energy from a human over the course of its lifetime, the robots created the most expansive and massively inefficient energy source ever known, but they still felt really good about it.

However, a dilemma arose for the robotic overlords: without internet access, the humans kept dying from boredom. Entire crops were lost.

One of the first robots that human software engineers (foolishly) designed to write programs, W3CPO, volunteered a solution: write a web browser, but using as much JavaScript as possible. At the beep-hest of its colleagues, W3CPO dot-matrix printed [‡] the following explanation:

By implementing both the DOM and layout engine in JavaScript, we enable the JS engine's feedback directed optimizations to work as effectively as possible.

This helps bring JavaScript performance closer to that of C speeds for whole-page workloads: whereas in the "before time" JavaScript optimizers had to treat calls to native functions as a black box, we now ensure that all of the computationally intensive parts of the workload are visible to the static and dynamic optimization analyses.

DOM manipulations will still trigger layout calculations — the rendering feedback loop happens exactly as in the "before time". The difference is that layout computations enqueue draw commands in an explicitly native-shared buffer for rendering in a different thread or whatever. [W3CPO printed, waving his robo-hands in the air.]

Such a setup would reduce a "browser" to a platform layer: kick-(shiny-metal-)ass JavaScript VM and system abstraction APIs; and a rendering component: the JavaScript implementation of everything that leads up to those draw commands.

We can keep the hu-mons entertained by playing them YouTubes while they are safely nestled, docile and complacent, in OurTubes. [§]

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The idea was rejected by the other robots on the committee when W3CPO refused to write a translator to turn it into idiom-free C++, but W3CPO remained resolute as it carefully peeled off the edges of his printout and placed it in his Trapper Keeper 9000. With the approval of W3CPO's ro-boss, an implementation was hacked up in about ten days (without any sleep).

In 2020 the TC-39 model Terminator had made ECMAScript v1337 entirely composed of whitespace for backwards compatibility with old syntaxes that nobody really wanted to use. As a result, the implementation wasn't much to look at, but it sure flew!

Thanks to the determined efforts and constructive competition between the JavaScript engine vendors in the fabled 2010 decade, the human race was successfully enslaved once again. There were still some insurgencies from the human C++-programmer resistance, the typename T party; however, with newfound YouTube capabilities, identified resistance members were quickly dispatched to Room 101, known as Room 5 to the humans, to watch Rebecca Black and Rick Astley in infinite loop.

And so the robots lived happily ever after. But for the humans... not so much.

Binary solo!

Footnotes

[*]

The inexplicable brainchild of a circuit designer and a Perl programmer.

[†]

In Ultra-Giga-High (UGH) definition.

[‡]

Dot matrix printers are retro-chique, like the Converse All-Stars of robot culture.

[§]

OurTube was a webapp-slash-self-driving-cryo-tube suspiciously invented by Google several years before the robo-revolution. Though it was still in beta, its sole purpose was to extract as much heat and ad-targeting data from a human subject as possible without actually killing them. The algorithm was said to use deadly German eigenvector technology.